Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sections
You are here: Home About Press Press Clips WFC Receives Salmon Recovery Funding Board Grants for Four Projects

WFC Receives Salmon Recovery Funding Board Grants for Four Projects

Wild Fish Conservancy received Washington Salmon Recovery Funding Board funding for four important restoration/conservation projects.

Hood Canal NearshoreThe Washington Salmon Recovery Funding Board and the Puget Sound Partnership recently released the 2015 Salmon Recovery Grant Funding Report. The annual report details this year’s awarded grants to organizations around the state for projects that will restore salmon habitat and conserve pristine areas. Wild Fish Conservancy received funding for four important restoration/conservation projects. Below is a brief description for each of the projects.  For a complete list of funded projects, see the 2015 Salmon Recovery Grant Funding Report.

Hood Canal Summer Chum Nearshore Habitat Use Assessment
Grant Awarded: $396,400

Wild Fish Conservancy will use this grant to study Hood Canal Summer Chum Salmon’s use of nearshore habitat. The Conservancy will conduct intensive field work collecting 2 years of fish use data, as well as perform statistical modeling and reporting to develop an assessment of nearshore habitat usage by juvenile Summer Chum Salmon. The goal of the project is to refine the recovery strategy and project selection process for Hood Canal Summer Chum Salmon, which are listed as threatened with extinction under the federal Endangered Species Act.

Middle Pilchuck Large Woody Debris Design                        
Grant Awarded: $100,561

Wild Fish Conservancy will use grant funds to develop preliminary designs for Engineered Log Jam (ELJ) restoration treatments in the Middle Pilchuck River. The goal of the project is to restore the historic floodplain processes and function in the treatment reach. Although habitat in this reach of the river is degraded, there is still a high concentration of chinook spawning. Adding ELJs, which encourage complex flow patterns and pool formation, will improve rearing habitat in the reach. ELJs will be designed to persist through high water events and to encourage scour patterns that will direct flow away from actively eroding un-vegetated banks, which will be planted through a co-occurring installation.

WRIA 13 Water Type Assessment Phase IV
Grant Awarded: $80,500

Wild Fish Conservancy will determine and correct water type classifications in ~34 miles of streams in prioritized portions of the McLane and Deschutes watersheds in WRIA 13 using established protocols. Existing watertype maps demonstrably under-represent the extent of fish and fish habitat, and many streams are mapped incorrectly or not at all. Consequently, many stream channels that warrant protection may not receive appropriate buffers. In addition to providing data to ensure informed and responsible management of these watersheds, this assessment will assist with habitat restoration and protection project identification and prioritization efforts by providing data on fish species composition and distribution via field observations and use of eDNA, and by identifying the five highest priority habitat restoration projects encountered during the assessment.

WRIA 14 Water Type Assessment Phase III
Grant Awarded: $110,500

Wild Fish Conservancy will determine and correct water type classifications in ~34 miles of streams in prioritized portions of WRIA 14 using established protocols. Existing watertype maps demonstrably under-represent the extent of fish and fish habitat, and many streams are mapped incorrectly or not at all. Consequently, many stream channels that warrant protection may not receive appropriate buffers. The project benefits all salmonid species, including steelhead, Coho, Chum, and Cutthroat.


Document Actions